Tag Archives: Walk

Madagascar 2016 – A comprehensive list of species I have seen.

Hello everyone,

Only recently, I returned (slightly earlier than planned) from my latest adventure to the ancient and most biologically diverse islands on the planet, the island of Madagascar.

For the past few months I have been traveling the eastern and central regions of this most magical of places, sleeping rough in a tent the middle of the rainforest to hiking through some of the most beautiful and richest landscapes I have came across.

Of course, you will be able to find out all about my adventures within my blog which I hope to update as much as I possibly can whilst traying to filter through my photographs and video footage that I capture during my trip. These will more than likely be randomly updated with no set order except with in order of where I was at the dates that I specify.

I promise, you will not be disappointed by your wait for my updates, on my travels I have came across over 65 species of Amphibian, 35 species of Reptile, 22 species of Mammal and countless numbers of Arthropoda/Invertebrates and Plants. Speakin of which, I have decided to add a comprehensive list of what I have seen on here, including the common names which before this, never existed.

Here are a few teaser pictures of things to expect in 2016/2017:

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Baron’s Mantella (Mantella baroni) at the cascade of Maromizaha Experimental Reserve, Madagascar (Analamazoatra region). © 2016 – Joshua Ralph – All Rights Reserved.

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Lance-nosed Chameleon (Calumma gallus) male specimen at Vohimana Experimental Reserve, Madagascar (Analamazoatra region). © 2016 – Joshua Ralph – All Rights Reserved.

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Silver Stream Frog (Mantidactylus (maitsomantis) argenteus) male specimen at Vohimana Experimental Reserve, Madagascar (Analamazoatra region). © 2016 – Joshua Ralph – All Rights Reserved.

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White-fronted Brown Lemur (Eulemur albifrons) at Nosy Mangabe Reserve Speciale, Madagascar (Antongili Bay). © 2016 – Joshua Ralph – All Rights Reserved.

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Speckled Water Snake (Thamnosophis epistibes) at Mitsinjo Forest Reserve, Madagascar (Analamazoatra region). © 2016 – Joshua Ralph – All Rights Reserved.

Amphibia 
Order: Anura (Frogs & Toads)

Subfamily: Boophinae
Genus: Boophis (Bright-eyed Frogs)
1. Goudot’s Bright-eyed Frog (Boophis goudotii),
2. Guibe’s Brigh-eyed Frog (Boophis guibei),
3. Id’s Bright-eyed Frog (Boophis idae),
4. Flamed Bright-eyed Frog (Boophis pyrrhus),
5. Madagascan Bright-eyed Frog (Boophis madagascariensis),
6. Green Bright-eyed Frog (Boophis viridis),
7. Central Bright-eyed Frog (Boophis rappiodes),
8. Bott’s Bright-eyed Frog (Boophis bottae),
9. Boehme’s Bright-eyed Frog (Boophis boehmei),

Subfamily: Cophylinae
Genus: Anodonthyla (Dual-thumbed Frogs)
10. Black-throated Dual-thumbed Frog (Anodonthyla pollicaris),

Genus: Platypelis (Arboreal Frogs)
11. Barbour’s Arboreal Frog (Platypelis barbouri)
12. Andasibe Arboreal Frog (Platypelis sp. aff. “Andasibe”)
13. Giant Arboreal Frog (Platypelis grandis)
14. Yellow Spotted Arboreal Frog (Platypelis tuberifera)

Genus: Plethodontohyla (Digging Frogs)
15. Spotted Digging Frog (Plethodontohyla notosticta),
16. Mihanika Digging Frog (Plethodontohyla mihanika),

Genus: Stumpffia (Thumbnail Frogs)
17. Thumbnail Frog (Stumpffia sp. “Nosy Mangabe”)i,
18. Thumbnail Frog (Stumpffia sp. “Nosy Mangabe”)ii,
19. Thumbnail Frog (Stumpffia sp. “Andasibe”)
20. Thumbnail Frog (Stumpffia sp. “Vohimana”)

Subfamily: Dyscophinae
Genus: Dyscophus (Tomato Frogs)
21. Antongili Tomato Frog (Dyscophus antongilii),
22. Sambava Tomato Frog (Dyscophus guineti)

Subfamily: Hyperoliinae
Genus: Heterixalus (Reed Frogs)
23. Madagascan Reed Frog (Heterixalus madagascariensis)
24. Spotted Reed Frog (Heterixalus punctatus),
25. Betsileo’s Reed Frog (Heterixalus betsileo)

Subfamily: Laliostominae
Genus: Aglyptodactylus (Canary Frogs)
26. Malagasy Canary Frog (Aglyptodactylus madagascariensis),

Subfamily: Mantellinae
Genus: Bloomersia (Leaping Frogs)
27. Moramanga Leaping Frog (Bloomersia bloomersae),

Genus: Gephyromantis (Forest Frogs)
28. Asper Forest Frog (Gephyromantis (Duboimantis) asper)
29. White Forest Frog (Gephyromantis (Duboimantis) luteus),
30. Boulenger’s Forest Frog (Gephyromantis (Gephyromantis) boulengeri),
31. Sculpted Forest Frog (Gephyromantis (Duboimantis) sculpturatus),
32. White-marked Forest Frog (Gephyromantis (Duboimantis) leucomaculatus) “Nosy Mangabe”,
33. Webb’s Forest Frog (Gephyromantis (Vatomantis) webbi)
34. Cryptic Forest Frog (Gephyromantis (Vatomantis) silvanus)

Genus: Guibemantis (Vakona Frogs)
35. Free Vakona Frog (Guibemantis liber),
36. Beautiful Vakona Frog (Guibemantis pulcher),
37. Torner’s Vakona Frog (Guibemantis torneri),
38. Guibemantis sp. aff. “Andasibe”
39. Guibemantis aff. albolineatus
40. Pulsing Vakona Frog (Guibemantis depressiceps)

Genus: Mantella (Malagasy Poison Frogs)
41. Arboreal Mantella (Mantella laevigata)
42. Beautiful Mantella (Mantella pulchra)
43. Baron’s Mantella (Mantella baroni)
44. Hybrid Mantella (Mantella pulchra x M.baroni) i.
45. Hybrid Mantella (Mantella pulchra x M.baroni) ii.

Genus: Mantidactylus (Stream Frogs)
46. Femoral Stream Frog (Mantidactylus (Ochthomantis) femoralis),
47. Betsileo’s Stream Frog (Mantidactylus (Brygoomantis) betsileanus),
48. Charlotte’s Stream Frog (Mantidactylus (Chonomantis) charlotteae),
49. Grandidier’s Giant Stream Frog (Mantidactylus (Mantidactylus) grandidieri),
50. Nosy Mangabe Giant Stream Frog (Mantidactylus (Mantidactylus) sp. aff. grandidieri),
51. Cowan’s Stream Frog (Mantidactylus (Hylobatrachus) cowani),
52. Zipper’s Stream Frog (Mantidactylus (Chonomantis) zipperi),
53. Black Flanked Stream Frog (Mantidactylus (Chonomantis) melanopleura),
54. Grey Stream Frog (Mantidactylus (Mantidactylus) guttulatus),
55. Mantidactylus (Brygoomantis) sp. aff. betsileanus,
56. Mantidactylus (Hylobatrachus) sp. aff. cowani,
57. (Mantidactylus (Chonomantis) opiparis)
58. Mantidactylus (Brygoomantis) sp. aff. biporus “Maromizaha”
59. Mantidactylus (Brygoomantis) sp. aff. biporus “Pale Form”
60. Mantidactylus (Brygoomantis) sp. aff. biporus “Vohimana”
61. Silver Stream Frog (Mantidactylus (maitsomantis) argenteus)
62. Andrangoloaka Stream Frog (Mantidactylus (Chonomantis) aerumnalis)
63. Tricoloured Stream Frog (Mantidactylus (Brygoomantis) sp. aff. tricinctus “Andasibe”)

Genus: Spinomantis (Malagasy Mossy Frogs)
64. Aglave’s Mossy Frog (Spinomantis aglavei),
65. Frilled Mossy Frog (Spinomantis fimbriatus),

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Reptilia
Order: Squamata

Family: Chamaeleonidae
Genus: Brookesia (Leaf Chameleons)
1. Peyrieras’ Leaf Chameleon (Brookesia peyrieras)
2. Browed Leaf Chameleon (Brookesia superciliaris)
3. Thiel’s Leaf Chameleon (Brookesia thieli)

Genus: Calumma (Horned Chameleons)
4. Elephant-eared Chameleon (Calumma brevicorne)
5. Parson’s Chameleon (Calumma parsonii cristifer)
6. Lance-nosed Chameleon (Calumma gallus)
7. Flat-nosed Chameleon (Calumma nasutum)
8. Yellow Striped Chameleon (Calumma gastrotaenia)
9. Deceptive Chameleon (Calumma fallax)

Genus: Furcifer (Panther and Carpet Chameleons)
10. Panther Chameleon (Furcifer pardalis) “Nosy Mangabe”
11. Panther Chameleon (Furcifer pardalis) “Toamasina”
12. Carpet Chameleon (Furcifer lateralis)

Family: Gerrhosauride
Genus: Zonosaurus (Girdled Lizards)
13. Malagasy Girdled Lizard (Zonosaurus madagascariensis)
14. Brygoo’s Girdled Lizard (Zonosaurus brygooi)

Family: Scincidae
Genus: Trachylepis (Miniature Skinks)
15. Boettger’s Miniature Skink (Trachylepis boettgeri)

Genus: Madascincus (Malagasy Skink)
16. Dark-ribbed Malagasy Skink (Madascincus melanopleura)

Family: Gekkonidae
Genus: Blaesodactylus (Velvet Geckos)
17. Antongili Velvet Gecko (Blaesodactylus aff. antongilensis)

Genus: Ebenavia (Clawless Geckos)
18. Masacrine Clawless Gecko (Ebenavia inunguis)

Genus: Gehyra (Web-toed Geckos)
19. Web-toed Gecko (Gehyra mutilata)

Genus: Hemidactylus (Half-toed Geckos)
20. Trader’s Half-toed Gecko (Hemidactylus mercatorius)

Genus: Paroedura (Ground Geckos)
21. Graceful Ground Gecko (Paroedura gracilis)

Genus: Uroplatus (Leaf-taile Geckos)
22. Frilled Leaf-tailed Gecko (Uroplatus fimbriatus)
23. Mossy Leaf-tailed Gecko (Uroplatus sikorae)

Genus: Lygodactylus (Dwarf Geckos)
24. Guibe’s Dwarf Gecko (Lygodactylus guibei)
25. Two-lined Dwarf Gecko (Lygodactylus bivittis)

Genus: Phelsuma (Day Geckos)
26. Madagascan Day Gecko (Phelsuma madagascariensis)
27. Lined Day Gecko (Phelsuma lineata)
28. Peacock Day Gecko (Phelsuma quadriocellata)

Family: Boidae
Genus: Sanzinia (Tree Boas)
29. Malagasy Tree Boa (Sanzinia madagascariensis madagascariensis)

Family: Colubridae
Genus: Madagascarophis (Malagasy Cat-eyed Snakes)
30. Cunning Cat-eyed Snake (Madagascarophis colubrinus)

Genus: Stenophis (Arboreal Snakes)
31. Banded Arboreal Snake (Stenophis arctifasciatus)

Genus: Pseudoxyrhopus (Brook Snakes)
32. Night Brook Snake (Pseudoxyrhopus heterurus)
33. Three-lined Brook Snake (Pseudoxyrhopus tritaeniatus)

Family: Lamprophiidae
Genus: Thamnosophis (Malagasy Water Snakes)
34. Lateral-lined Water Snake (Thamnosophis lateralis)
35. Speckled Water Snake (Thamnosophis epistibes)

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Mammalia
Order: Primates

Family: Cheirogaleidae
Genus: Microcebus (Mouse Lemurs)
1. Goodman’s Mouse Lemur (Microcebus lehilahytsara)
2. Simmon’s Mouse Lemur (Microcebus simmonsi)
3. Macarthur’s Mouse Lemur (Microcebus macarthurii)

Genus: Allocebus (Hairy-eared Mouse Lemur)
4. Hairy-eared Dwarf Lemur (Microcebus trichotis)

Genus: Cheirogaleus (Fat-tailed Lemurs)
5. Greater Fat-tailed Lemur (Cheirogaleus major)
6. Crossley’s Fat-tailed Lemur (Cheirogaleus crossleyi)

Family: Lepilemuridae
Genus: Lepilemur (Sportive Lemurs)
7. Greater Sportive Lemur (Lepilemur mustelinus)

Family: Lemuridae
Genus: Hapalemur (Bamboo Lemurs)
8. Grey Bamboo Lemur (Hapalemur griseus griseus)

Genus: Eulemur (True Lemurs)
9. Brown Lemur (Eulemur fulvis)
10. White-fronted Brown Lemur (Eulemur albifrons)
11. Red-bellied Lemur (Eulemur rubriventer)

Genus: Varecia (Ruffed Lemurs)
12. Black & White Ruffed Lemur (Varecia variegata)

Family: Indriidae
Genus: Avahi (Woolly Lemurs)
13. Eastern Woolly Lemur (Avahi laniger)

Genus: Propithecus (Sifaka)
14. Diademed Sifaka (Propithecus diadema)

Genus: Indri
15. Indri Lemur (Indri indri)

Family: Dubentoniidae
Genus: Daubentonia (Aye-aye)
16. Aye-aye (Daubentonia madagascariensis)

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Order: Afrosoricida

Family: Tenrecidae
Genus: Hemicentetes (Streaked Tenrec)
17. Lowland Streaked Tenrec (Hemicentetes semispinosus)

Genus: Setifer (Hedgehog Tenrec)
18. Greater Hedgehog Tenrec (Setifer setosus)

Genus: Tenrec
19. Common Tenrec (Tenrec encaudatus)

Genus: Microgale (Shrew Tenrecs)
20. Dobson’s shrew tenrec (Microgale dobsoni)

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Order: Rodentia

Family: Nesomyidae
Genus: Eliurus (Tufted-tailed Rats)
21. Webb’s Tufted-tailed Rat (Eliurus webbi)

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Order: Carnivora

Family: Eupleridae
Genus: Galidia (Ring-tailed Mongoose)
22. Galidia elega

I hope you are excited, because first up on my blog entry list is my adventures on Nosy Mangabe, perhaps one of the most beautiful places I have ever been to in my life time.

Until next time!

Joshua Ralph
MantellaMan

Amphibian Conservation Fundraising Event.

Some of you that are now reading this blog entry may know me already, but from those of you that don’t or haven’t read my ‘About Me’ section on my website, then please allow me to introduce my self, my name is Joshua Ralph and I am a Batrachologist, Conservationist and Zoo Keeper. Now, some of you that aren’t really familar to animal terminology my be wondering what on earth a ‘Batrachologist’ is, well it is a person who specialises in the study of Amphibia (Frogs, Toads, Newts, Salamanders and Caecillians) within the specific field of zoology.

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Me at the Bakozetra locality in the Torotorofotsy Wetlands Reserve, Madagascar. A well known locality hosting the endangered Yellow Mantella (Mantella crocea) species, a genus I love the most within the class of Amphibia. © 2015 – Joshua Ralph – All Rights Reserved.

I have always loved working with and keeping Amphibian species, and it is my upmost passion and a path I have chosen to work within since before the age of seven years old. As generalised as I try to be, I am incredibly biased towards the species found upon a very biologically important and completely unique island, this of course is Madagascar. For those of you that aren’t entirely aware of the island or infact knew it was a real place, let me give you some information regarding it.

MADAGASCAR IN AN OVERFLOWING NUTSHELL.
Measuring a grand total of 592,800 square kilometres (or 228,900 sq miles for those of you that prefer to use this form of measurement), it is recorded as the fourth largest island on the planet and with this quantity of land along with total island isolation, the wildlife upon it have had all this time to evolve into the life you can find today. Most of which are entirely endemic, as a matter of fact over 90% of all life on Madagascar can only be found upon it. Regarding Amphibia, currently there is thought to be roughly 300 species accounted for that have been described, however more are still awaiting appropriate description and even discovery out of all the species of Amphibia found on Madagascar, 99.5% of them are completely endemic. According to R. G. B. Perl and other researchers, in the article titled “DNA Barcoding Madagascar’s Amphibian Fauna”, it is listed that just over 500 species are to be found within their country of origin, but it is believed to inhabit a greater amount than above said quantity, by approximately 200 species.

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Measuring a grand total of 592,800 square kilometres (228,900 sq miles), it is the fourth largest island on the planet.

These amazing animals, are currently in trouble (as is the case for a majority of life upon the island) with risks from highly invasive species such as the Asian Common Toad (Duttaphrynus melanostictus) and the deadly fungal infection, Chytridiomycosis (Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis) a fungal disease that has caused the extinction of many species across the planet already!!

CHYTRIDIOMYCOSIS – THE LETHAL AMPHIB KILLER.
Chytridiomycosis (or commonly known as Chytrid Fungus) is an emerging infectious disease to the class of Amphibians, caused by the aquatic fungal pathogen, Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd). There are numerous Chytrid fungi members that can be found within the class of Chytridiomycetes. A lot of Chytrids are are what is known as Saprophytes, fungi living on the dead decaying organic matter, arguably making one of their most important ecological functions, decomposition. However Bd, is very unique in comparision to other Chytrids.

Having been first described in 1999, this new species was found to infect (with much success) Amphibian species. What makes this even more unusual, is the fact it is the only Chytrid to parasictically attack a vertebrate species and further more, specically only Amphibians. It is often highly contagious and infection predominately occurs inside the cells of the outer skin layers that contain large amounts of keratin.  As you may be aware, Keratin is what hair, feathers and claws are made of and helps by making the outside of the skin tough and more resistant to injury. The biggest trait that Amphibians predominately have is  a Permeable skin, which is highly important for Gaseous exchange that can take place with some of the class it also helps with the absorbtion of important salts (electrolytes) like sodium and potassium through the skin. Chytridiomycosis, changes that entirely, forcing the skin to become thicker due to Microscopic changes that are known as “hyperplasia and hyperkeratosis”. Abnormal electrolyte levels as the result of Bd-damage the skin causing the heart to literally stop beating and obviously killing the infected animal (Voyles et al., 2009 and in other species that are entirely dependant on their skin to breathe such as Lungless Salamanders, it causes suffocation.

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#SAVEMADAGASCAR – © 2015 – Joshua Ralph – All Rights Reserved.

Both fortunately and unfortunately, not all Amphibians die from this fungal infection, with some species being “resistant” to the adverse effects and instead becoming carriers. These species in particular, such as the African Clawed Frog (Xenopus laevis), are of major concern to all Amphibians susceptible to the fungus Zoospores, due to being able to spread the infection further and cause further damage to other populations and of course cause extinction. In approximately only 30 years, Bd has caused the catastrophic decline or extinction (in many cases within a single year) of at least 200 species of frogs, even in pristine, remote habitats (Skerratt et al. 2007) some of them iconic such as the Australian Gastro-brooding Frogs (Rheobatrachus) and the neotropical Golden Toad (Incilius periglenes).

I wish to raise money for my associate partner, the Amphibian Survival Alliance (Amphibians.org) and their projects to eliminate the threats that Madagascar’s amphibians are facing, by doing something unusual and difficult.

THE PILGRIM’S WAY (UK)- WINCHESTER TO CANTERBURY SPONSORED WALK.
As a side hobby, on the weekends I re-enact 12th century Norman England with one of the UK’s premiere 12th century re-enactment societies, where I perform in unscripted and realistic combat displays. As a result, I own a lot of Norman period warriors attire, from real Maille (Chainmail as you may incorrectly know it), steel Helmets, heavy duty shields to even weaponry.

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Me in my very real armour, one of the many different forms of armour of a Norman warrior during the 12th century would have worn. © 2015 – Joshua Ralph – All Rights Reserved.

I wanted to do something a bit different to Skydiving or Bungee Jumping, and I finally decided that I will do a certain walk known as the Pilgrim’s Way, a 119+ mile pilgrimage route from Winchester (Hampshire, UK) to Canterbury (Kent, UK), a journey taking 12-14 days in total. However, I am not just doing a walk, oh no, its far more interesting than that! I plan to do this wearing the full attire of a 12th century Norman warrior, head to toe clad in armour and clothing authentic to the period. (I will weigh all my clothing and equipment I will take I know what you are more than likely saying, “This has nothing to do with animals.” and “What does this have to do with Amphibians?” And my answer to that is, well, it doesn’t have to have anything to do with my passion and the conservation efforts currently taking place in Madagascar. Also, my own reasons for doing this walk has NOTHING to do with relgion, it is just something that I thought would be both challenging and interesting.

Anyway, I shall be posting again shortly and creating a section on my website that will be dedicated to my Fundraising event so please do share this page for now on Facebook, Twitter etc so we can all make a difference and save the Amphibians of Madagascar whilst we still can…

Thank you for reading,

Joshua Ralph
(MantellaMan)